Mixed Aviaries

Definition : more than one species of bird housed in the same aviary. The aim is to keep species which occupy different areas or niches in the aviary. e.g. parrots and quail

(As distinct from a colony : greater than one pair of the same species)
Advantages :

greater variety of birds may be kept

more interesting collections

Disadvantages :

compatibility

risk of fighting and injury

feeding and housing requirements may be different

may be different in the breeding season

more work !

Compatibility of different groups of birds

parrots

finches

pigeons and doves

quail

Examples of compatible collections

Habitat Aviaries : a collection of species found in one area/habitat e.g. the Adelaide Hills. Well represented at the Adelaide Zoo.

Compatibility of Australian Parrots
Docile Neophema – small, docile
Polytelis – docile (except breeding) but large
Cockatiel
Pugnacious Red-rumps
Hoode
Golden-shouldered
Aggressive Blue-bonnets
Rosellas
Ringnecks
Lorikeets
Cockatoos

Compatibility of Australian Finches
Aggressive species : Crimson Finch
Beautiful Firetail – to own kind
Red-eared Firetail – to own kind
Dominating species : Zebra
Black-throated
Long-tailed
Diamond Firetail

Different Habitats e.g. Painted Firetail (dry open) and Blue-faced Parrot Finch (wet, planted)

Do not house large parrots, quail or pigeons with finches

Compatibility of Pigeons and Doves

Most are compatible with mixed collection of small parrots, finches and quail

Spinifex and Partridge parrots are aggressive ground dwellers

Closely related species may fight

Arboreal and terrestrial species will mix e.g. fruit-dove and Spinifex

Compatibility of Quail

Bob-white and California Quail fly – upset nesting finches

Black-breasted Button-quail defend their nest/young vigorously